Service and Support Administration

Commonly asked questions & answers
about Service and Support Administration

 What is an SSA (Service and Support Administration)?

A service and support administrator (SSA) is a person who works for a County Board of DD and is assigned to you* to act as the main point of coordination and contact for services and supports you need.  Your SSA is a trouble-shooter, problem-solver and an advocate for you.

Why would I want an SSA assigned to me?

  • You want to know what services & supports and community resources that may be available to you.
  • You live in an ICF or nursing home and would like to move to a place in the community.
  • You want a community job with meaningful pay.
  • You want help in getting a provider (or a new provider) for some of the services you need.
  • If you already are on a waiting list, to say what you are waiting for, and ask how soon it will be available.

Once you have an SSA, you can expect your SSA to: 

  • Call you back promptly.
  • Be honest with you about what services & supports and community resources you may receive.
  • Connect you with people who can help you achieve desired outcomes & promote independence in the community.
  • Help you find housemates.
  • Help you solve problems with providers, or other people in your life.
  • Help you decide what is in your ISP.

What is an Individual Service Plan (ISP)?

Individual Service Plan (ISP) means the written description of services, supports, and community resources to support you.  Your SSA helps you and the rest of your team decide what services and supports to put in your ISP for these areas of your life:

  • Self determination (choices, opportunities);
  • Self advocacy (personal control);
  • Health care and daily living skills (personal care and independence);
  • Emotional health (self worth, self esteem, satisfaction with life and spirituality);
  • Material well being (employment, money, education and housing);
  • Personal development (experiencing success, learning to do new things on your own);
  • Interpersonal relationships (social contacts, relationships, emotional support);
  • Social inclusion (doing things in your community, doing things with friends/ family).

What is a team?

Your team is a group of people who can give you support to develop and change your ISP.  The group that makes up your team includes your SSA, people who work with you, providers, professionals, your guardian (if you have a guardian), and any other people you choose to help support you.  In thinking about people you want to include, consider people you know and trust, such as family members, friends, and others who have your best interests in mind.  Your SSA can help you decide who you want on your team, and who you want to invite to meet­ings about your ISP.

What is role of Natural Support?

Your SSA makes sure that your ISP includes all of your services and supports no matter who pro­vides it, who pays for it, or if it is a natural support or a service that is not covered by a Medicaid waiver.  Natural support comes to you from your personal relationships, is not a paid support, and usually is provided by a family member, friend, neighbor, or other people or organizations that also do the same thing for other people who live in your community.

What is Person-Centered Planning?

Your SSA will help you develop or change your ISP after listening to you explain what you need, how you would like things to be in the future, your interest in school or a job, what you think is working and not working well for you, and other things that are important to you.  Your SSA will help you and your team use a person-centered approach to develop, review and change your ISP.  Person-centered means that everything centers on you and what you say, and that you get to share what you think about things other team members say.  It also means that you get to speak up about the things that you want the team to know, and that you want to have in your ISP.

 

Can my SSA help me have different things in my life in the future?

Yes.  Your SSA and your team, must support the outcomes you want.  Outcomes are things you want to have in your life, learn to do, get, or do in the future.  These are things that do not exist right now. Outcomes are also things that are important for you.  Your SSA must make sure that you and your team agree on the things that are important to you and the things that are important for you — find a good balance.